Weight Loss Surgery | Los Angeles | Orange County | Inland Empire

LAP-BAND

Gastric bypass surgery is performed to help morbidly obese patients lose significant amounts of weight.

Pouch Revision Surgery

Gastric bypass surgery is performed to help morbidly obese patients lose significant amounts of weight.

Gastric Sleeve

Gastric bypass surgery is performed to help morbidly obese patients lose significant amounts of weight.

Gastric Bypass

Gastric bypass surgery is performed to help morbidly obese patients lose significant amounts of weight.

Weight Loss Surgery | Los Angeles | Orange County | Inland Empire Weight Loss Surgery | Los Angeles | Orange County | Inland Empire Weight Loss Surgery | Los Angeles | Orange County | Inland Empire
Diabetes Superfoods

June 15th, 2012 By Jeremy Korman

How Many Calories Should a Gastric Sleeve Patient Consume after Surgery?

Weight loss is such a complicated and emotional issue, with so many opinions being expressed and solutions proposed, that it can be easy to lose sight of the one basic principle that governs weight loss:

If you use more energy than you consume, your body has to get that energy from somewhere. Fat is the body’s backup energy store. Burn more than you eat and, all other things being normal, you will lose weight over time. 

Of course, there are complicating factors

Sometimes, someone has a medical condition that makes it more difficult to exercise or affects the metabolism. Sometimes, persistent hunger, longstanding habit or emotional issues make it seem impossible to control our eating habits in a healthy way through willpower alone.

This is where gastric sleeve surgery comes into play. With this procedure, a surgeon permanently removes part of the stomach. The remaining part holds less food, so the patient gets full more easily, with less food. In addition, the gastric sleeve may affect the production of ghrelin, the “hunger hormone,” making it still easier to handle hunger and avoid unwise eating habits.

But the basic mathematics are clear. Calories are the energy stored in food, which the body burns to keep itself running. A pound of fat contains 3,500 calories — about 9 calories per gram. A gram of carbohydrate contains about 4 calories; so does a gram of protein. If you add up all the calories contained in the fat, carbs, and protein you consume, and then subtract the calories you burn through exercise and day-to-day activity, you will end up with a positive number, a negative number, or zero.When we have consistently “positive” results day after day, we gain weight. When the number is consistently negative, we lose weight. When the result is consistently balanced over time, we maintain our weight.

The human body’s calorie needs depend on body mass, age, and other factors. For a normally active person in the normal range of the body-mass index, the daily recommended calorie intake is about 2,000 for men, a little less for women and children. The great majority of your calories should come from lean, healthy sources, along with some “good” fats, such as olive oil or avocado.

Seriously overweight people on calorie-restricted diets have to carefully monitor the number and sources of the calories they consume. They want to consume significantly fewer than those 2,000 calories so that they can lose up to three pounds per week — sometimes even more, in the case of seriously obese people in the weeks immediately after surgery. As the body gets lighter, its calorie needs decrease, so weight loss will likely slow down, even if the person continues eating exactly the same diet.

So what is the magic number?

Well, that depends on several factors. No two people’s calorie needs are exactly the same. However, people on calorie-restricted diets, such as the one you’ll be on after gastric sleeve surgery, often follow a plan containing 1,200 calories or so per day, sometimes even less. Priority is given to protein- and fiber-rich foods and to vegetables that do not contain many calories.  However, we don’t like to generalize, because your diet will be devised specifically to meet your needs.

Our nutritionist will meet with you to determine what those needs are and how to meet them, including how many calories your diet should have. This is a standard component of the complete medical weight-loss service we offer to our patients. To schedule an appointment to discuss the operation or the diet you’ll follow afterward, call us at (800) 491-1977.

References:

By Jeremy Korman